[文章摘要學習]父母固定上教堂 有助兒童正面發展

線上學習英文-父母固定上教堂 有助兒童正面發展 | 葉安娜成人美語家教班 Ana yeh english

文章摘要學習:

Among sev­er­al aspects of parental reli­gios­i­ty, church atten­dance exerts a con­sis­tent and pos­i­tive effect on five mea­sures of child devel­op­ment. The more that a child’s moth­er or father par­tic­i­pates in pub­lic wor­ship on a week­ly basis, the high­er the rat­ing of a child’s eager­ness to learn, vari­ety of inter­ests, cre­ativ­i­ty, per­sis­tence, and responsibility.

 在父母的宗教信仰觀點方面,出席教會在小孩的發展上發揮了五個持續並正面的影響。父母越多參與在每週的固定聚會,小孩的以下發展越好:

  1. eager­ness to learn 學習的渴望
  2. vari­ety of inter­ests 興趣的多樣性
  3. cre­ativ­i­ty 創造力
  4. per­sis­tence 持續力
  5. respon­si­bil­i­ty 責任感

——全文——

美國社會學專家日前公布一項研究,指出父母親擁有虔誠信仰,並且固定上教堂禮拜,對其小孩具有正面影響,而另一份研究也指出,具有宗教信仰的小孩其學業表現也優於其他無宗教信仰小孩。

社會學專家指出,根據研究,父母篤信宗教,並且固定帶小孩上教堂,有助於兒童正面發展。專家表示,兒童會從父母及老師身上學習其行為及觀念。而父母有固定上教堂習慣者,其小孩也會更有創造力、責任感及專注力。而固定參加教堂聚會的父母,也代表其擁有較高的自我控制力,連帶著小孩也會受其影響,另一方面,因小孩常出席聚會活動,使得他們擁有較佳的社交能力,比較容易與其他小朋友建立良好的人際關係。而另外,研究也指出,具有宗教信仰的父母,比較會為小孩未來做規劃,而時常參加教會活動的兒童,長大後有較高的解決問題能力,而由於常與父母親一同活動,家人凝聚力也較佳。而宗教團體強大的社會資源,可讓收入水平較低家庭之兒童,擁有較佳的學習榜樣,以及獲得更好的學習資源。

而另一項研究也指出,擁有虔誠宗教信仰的人在學業表現方面較優。根據調查,時常參加宗教聚會的小孩在數學及閱讀方面的能力比無宗教信仰之小孩表現較佳、而其在上大學後,會更努力於課業研究上,因此平均學業表現也較好。另外,擁有宗教信仰的學童其上課出席率普遍表現優良,而且輟學率較其他學生低。

雖然之前有報導指出,宗教信仰與道德並無必然關係。不過綜合以上調查,擁有宗教信仰,似乎對學童好處多多。如本身已為基督徒的父母,記得假日,多多帶著您的小孩參加教堂聚會活動喔。(吳雯淇/綜合外電報導)

全文轉自Kairos風向新聞

原文全文:連結

Parents’ church attendance linked to positive child development

Church atten­dance exerts a con­sis­tent and pos­i­tive effect on five mea­sures of child development.

A bipar­ti­san group of state law­mak­ers on Tues­day unveiled a plan to expand access to ear­ly learn­ing pro­grams for Minnesota’s need­i­est chil­dren,” accord­ing to the Twin Cities Pio­neer Press, though the plan may not have enough steam to move ahead.

A Bet­ter Chance”—or ABC Act—would make preschool schol­ar­ships, for birth through age five, avail­able to more of the state’s at-risk chil­dren. The leg­is­la­tion would also fund the Par­ent Aware Rat­ing Sys­tem, which is used to help decide if ear­ly-learn­ing pro­grams should be eli­gi­ble for state schol­ar­ships, and expand “home-vis­it­ing pro­grams pro­vid­ing sup­port for low-income fam­i­lies and the health and devel­op­ment needs of their children.”

All laud­able goals, to be sure, but research indi­cates that there is much, much more to ear­ly child­hood edu­ca­tion than the num­ber of state-fund­ed pro­grams available.

The New Research — Bet­ter than preschool

For at least a gen­er­a­tion, pol­i­cy elites have con­sid­ered “ear­ly education”—a euphemism for more insti­tu­tion­al day­care and nurs­ery schools—the Roset­ta stone that unlocks the mys­ter­ies of the healthy devel­op­ment of young chil­dren. Yet a study by researchers at Mis­sis­sip­pi State Uni­ver­si­ty, find­ing “robust and quite clear” links between parental church atten­dance and sev­er­al mea­sures of child devel­op­ment, sug­gests that the well being of chil­dren depends more on par­ents than on parental substitutes.

Crunch­ing data on more than 21,000 chil­dren enrolled in kinder­garten and first grade from the spring 2000 wave of Ear­ly Child­hood Lon­gi­tu­di­nal Study-Kinder­garten Class, the soci­ol­o­gists dis­cov­ered that Aamong sev­er­al aspects of parental reli­gios­i­ty, church atten­dance exerts a con­sis­tent and pos­i­tive effect on five mea­sures of child devel­op­ment. father’s and a mother’s church atten­dance, they found, each strong­ly cor­re­lat­ed with a child’s “approach to learn­ing” as eval­u­at­ed by par­ents and by teach­ers (p<.001 for all four coef­fi­cients). In oth­er words, the more that a child’s moth­er or father par­tic­i­pates in pub­lic wor­ship on a week­ly basis, the high­er the rat­ing of a child’s eager­ness to learn, vari­ety of inter­ests, cre­ativ­i­ty, per­sis­tence, and responsibility.

Each of these two church atten­dance vari­ables was also strong­ly linked to eval­u­a­tions of child self-con­trol by par­ents and teach­ers (p<.001 for three coef­fi­cients, p<.05 for one), to the eval­u­a­tion of a child’s social inter­ac­tion by par­ents (p<.01 for both), and the eval­u­a­tion of a child’s inter­per­son­al skills by teach­ers (p<.001 for mother’s atten­dance, p<.05 for father’s). In addi­tion, the two inde­pen­dent vari­ables yield­ed numer­ous, although not all, sta­tis­ti­cal­ly sig­nif­i­cant cor­re­la­tions with scales mea­sur­ing child sadness/loneliness and impulsiveness/overactiveness.

A third vari­able, “both par­ents attend [church] fre­quent­ly,” was sta­tis­ti­cal­ly asso­ci­at­ed with all five mea­sures of child devel­op­ment as rat­ed by par­ents and teach­ers (p<.05 for nine coef­fi­cients; p<.10 for one).

Explain­ing their find­ings, the researchers empha­size the “mul­ti­plica­tive effect” of parental church atten­dance on the well being of chil­dren: “It is not sim­ply gener­ic homogamy (cou­ple sim­i­lar­i­ty regard­less of reli­gios­i­ty), but rather the amount of reli­gion (e.g., stocks of ‘reli­gious cap­i­tal’) that a cou­ple can joint­ly import into the fam­i­ly that bol­sters child out­comes, espe­cial­ly for child per­for­mance out­side the home.” Giv­en how much pol­i­cy­mak­ers are look­ing for ways to boost the “school readi­ness” of chil­dren, these find­ings point to an over­looked and often ignored means to that end.

(Source: Bryce J. Chris­tensen and Robert W. Pat­ter­son, “New Research,” The Fam­i­ly in Amer­i­ca 24.2 [Spring 2010]. Study: John P. Bartkows­ki et al., “Reli­gion and Child Devel­op­ment: Evi­dence from the Ear­ly Child­hood Lon­gi­tu­di­nal Study,” 37.1 Social Sci­ence Research [2008]: 18–36.)

This arti­cle has been repub­lished with per­mis­sion from The Fam­i­ly in Amer­i­ca, a pub­li­ca­tion of The Howard Cen­ter. The Howard Cen­ter is a Mer­ca­tor­Net part­ner site.

You Might Also Like

向上滑動